MR. MACARONI AND THE TREND OF FREAKY WHOREDOM

Debo Adedayo (popularly known as Mr. Macaroni) is currently one of the most sensational comedians in Nigeria. In this era of comic skitmaking, Mr. Macaroni is one of the talented thespians who has all it takes to thrill you in a matter of seconds, and get your ribs cracking.

Mr. Macaroni’s fans are familiar with his unique style. It’s either he’s acting as a lecturer always mean to his students whom he often refers to as “boys and girls of doom”; or as a father looking to give out his daughter in marriage at all cost. But among all of these varying subjects of his engagement, one stands out – The “Freaky Freaky” concept.

In this “Freaky Freaky” idea, Mr. Macaroni depicts the character of a chronic womaniser whose exploits in promiscuity are second to none. He portrays a wealthy man whose senses automatically begin to suffer lack of coordination at the sight of a woman, especially one that is fully endowed.

This apparent sexually-triggered intoxication manifests in different forms, from dancing uncontrollably (with his hands lifting his agbada, his waist twisting and his legs moving in opposite directions) to him launching the next “potent attack.”

This “attack” is in the form of a subtle command – “Put your account number here”, he’d say to his target. He doesn’t appear to savour the idea of a lady bending the knee to greet him as a sign of respect. He’d immediately interrupt the move by asking the lady not to stain her legs, while maintaining his rapt attention on her endowments.

Mr. Macaroni has no time to waste. He doesn’t particularly treasure wooing a lady with too many words. He’d go straight to the point which aptly defines the disposition of the “Daughters of Eve” of this present age. Nothing impresses them like requesting their bank account details. So, Mr. Macaroni would ask the lady to type in her account number into his mobile phone to enable him initiate an instant electronic funds transfer.

The transfer signifies an upfront payment for the expected sexual entanglement which typically explains the whole idea of prostitution in the modern era, where even the “business” thrives using mobile applications. As soon as the lady confirms receipt of the transfer, the contract is concluded subject to performance by the lady of her own end of the bargain.

The amount of money Mr. Macaroni offers as consideration depends on his perception of the class in which the lady belongs. He offers from N500,000 to as much as N10 Million. By this, Mr. Macaroni mirrors what is currently obtainable in the society. Even in prostitution, there are levels to the “trade”, just like in all other professions.

A seemingly decent lady whom he approaches would appear to hesitate at first. But the moment Mr. Macaroni asks for her account number and eventually transfers a huge sum, within a flash, the lady falls like a butterfly after initial gragra (resistance).

Mr. Macaroni has been accused of objectifying women in some of his skits, an accusation which he has defended on multiple occasions. However, the reality is that Mr. Macaroni, also a well-known activist, is simply presenting us with the realities in a comic way.

These shots further advance the argument that women are all about the money. Undoubtedly, this is not always true. We still have women with high sense of value and responsibility; women who will not defile their temples in exchange for money, but will rather put their hands to work to earn their fortunes.

Perhaps, Mr. Macaroni’s activism may need to go beyond fighting police brutality and bad governance to discouraging promiscuity and modern day prostitution instead of appearing to promote it by his comic skits.



Stephen Azubuike
Author: Stephen Azubuike
Stephen is a lawyer with expertise in Commercial Dispute Resolution and Technology Law practice. He is a Partner at Infusion Lawyers. He has successfully argued cases from the High Courts of various jurisdictions to the Appellate Courts on behalf of financial institutions, other corporate bodies and multinationals. He has worked with a number of startup tech companies. He tweets @siazubuike.
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